El Nino – Are you safe

Mountain View RV Park.

El Nino

Mountain View RV Park

El Nino

Jacuzzi at Mountain View RV Park

We have just moved to a new RV Park in Santa Paula called Mountain View RV Park.  The Journey was only 20 minutes away so not a long journey at all.  Everything went well with the move and our spot was really easy to drive into.

Living here in Santa Paula, we feel quite safe.  The fact that with the El Nino, that people are talking about coming to California this fall, that we are going to be safe.

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Our spot at Mountain View RV park

El Nino

Lots of places to sit at the Jucuzzi

Santa Paula

Santa Paula is known as the citrus capital of the world and trust me there is orange and lemon trees everywhere you look.   Peter and I sing the song Orange and Lemons every time we go past them.  We just can’t help it.  We just love the smell.

In England where we are from we don’t have orange or lemon trees.  The first time we saw the orange and lemon groves here in this area was when we arrived in America in 2006 we had a trip to the beach at Ventura and drove down the 126 which were just lined with all the groves and it was just fascinating, we bought some oranges on our way home and they were the sweetest oranges and juiciest we had ever tasted.  Yum.

We really can’t believe that 8 years later we are living amongst the groves.  Just beautiful.

We really like living in RV Parks as we love meeting people and having a life that is as much indoors as outdoors and we like the fact that people who live in RVs meet up and socialize.

Peter just got home from work and we had a nice swim before dinner just fabulous, we were the only ones in the jacuzzi. A beer in one hand and a nice dip after a hard day, priceless.

The same day we moved in Mountain View RV Park we were invited over for snacks and a swim in the Jacuzzi with a few of the other guests staying at the park.  We met about 8 people and have already spoken to our wonderful neighbours who have been very helpful.

El Nino KTLA –  guideline.

On the news this morning they talked about being prepared for the El Nino coming in the fall.  It really made you think.  They explained all about what the El Nino is and to make sure that you know what to do should something happen like a mudslide.  Click the above link to see their explanation and the guideline they have said you should follow.

My take on it is that if you are prepared for earthquakes as you should be living in California, then you are prepared for the El Nino.  The same thing applies.  One of the things they did talk about though on the news was to make sure you have Wellington boots, they called them something else that Americans call them and I cannot remember what that is so here is a link of what the English call wellies

 

 

Keep your wellies in the car so that in the effect of a mudslide that you are able to walk away from the situation should you be trapped in your car.

We also feel that living further inland for the winter will be very beneficial, with the El Nino effect coming around the fall we have a feeling that living right by the beach may not be a good idea. Obviously you really do not know what can happen as living by the coast or inland in a valley can have a devastating effect no matter what.

The El Nino could cause mudslides from the mountains and the Santa Clara River in Santa Paula could fill and overflow or we could indeed have an earthquake living in California anyway.  We do feel a little safer inland from both as an earthquake could cause a Tsunami and being right there at the beach would not be a good place to be. Who knows what could happen but just that you should be prepared.

Be Prepared and check out the KTLA link above.

Stay safe and love to all.

 

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California Fires – are you prepared

Would you be ready to move your RV within 15 minutes if there was a fire?

California Fires

California fires

fire

California fires are a reality living in California and during our time here we have seen many fires.  With the many fires that are happening right now in Northern California it has been on many people conversations this past week.  The poor people who have lost their homes is just so sad.

The fire department came to our campsite just the other day and bought to attention to the owners that some campers have way to many items around their RVs.  When you live in your RV full-time you start to collect stuff.  Do not be a victim of California Fires and be prepared.

If you can honestly say that you could not move your RV in 15 minutes then you really need to have a rethink about the STUFF in your RV and around it.

We went through our RV and I can proudly say that we could move in 15 minutes having everything packed inside and out.

The only thing that would get left behind would be our tower garden and some plants.

A Place for Everything

In our RV we have a place for everything and the same plan every time we move sites.  This is how I start packing inside the house.  It normally takes me an hour as I just take my time when I pack away but I can certainly do it in 15 minutes and living in areas where California Fires are a reality, along with tsunamis and earthquakes we have certainly thought of this.

Here are my steps for packing.

1.  First thing I do is to pack my wine glasses into a wine glass protection case.  This releases a whole cupboard for my pictures and ornaments that I have around my RV.

california fires

Glass case

2.  Wrap ornaments in tea towels and place into cupboard that is now empty.  This does not take long.  I start in one area of the RV and work around so that nothing is missed.  All these items fit into that cupboard and then at the front and back I place cushions off the couch for extra safety.

california fires

Ornaments

3.  My washing machine goes into the shower, and the kitchen trash can go into the bathroom.

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4.   My shoes go into a box and also into the bathroom on the floor.  The shoe rack closes flat on goes onto the couch.

5.   My small folding table wheels into the corner where the shoes were along with the coffee table.

6.  The printer goes under the dining room chairs.

7.  The filing cabinet is put onto the couch.

8.  The two swivel chairs go back to back with the cupboard between them so that when the slides come in they have nowhere to go.

9.  Carpets are rolled up and put onto the bed.

10.  everything in the kitchen fits under the sink, except the knives that go under a chair also in the dining room.

11.  Anything on the dressing table in the bedroom fits into the bedroom cupboards.

12.  In the bathroom everything left out goes into the sink such as toothbrushes, soaps etc.

I then check that all the cupboards are shut properly and that there is nothing obstructing the slide outs.  I start in one spot and go all the way around.  We are then ready for the slide outs to come in.  One of the things I nearly forgot once was the hangers  I have over draws in the kitchen.

california fires

drawer hanger

Check ever inch and then get someone else to check too.

If you are having to move in a rush then just stay calm and go through mthodically.

1.  Stay Calm

2.  Make a Plan

3.  Have a place for everything

4.  Be organised

5.  Everything in the RV should have a home in the RV

6.  Everything outside of the RV has a home underneath the RV in storage when packing.

The only help I need inside the RV is to put the chairs back to back, everything else I can do very easily whilst my husband Peter does outside disconnecting the pipes and electricity and making sure everything is stored in the understorage compartments.

We have timed ourselves and it is tight but we can do all this in 15 minutes.

Organisation is the key to all of this.  If you do not have a place for everything then you will not succeed in getting away in time and saving your home and your life.

Leaving your RV in 2 Minutes

If you do not even get 15 minutes because maybe the fire is just too close, make sure that all your personal papers like passports and birth certificates are altogether and in something that you can pick up and run with and also keep them in a safe that if it burns they are not damaged inside.

This is the one that we have

california fires

Sentry safe

 

Make a plan today California Fires is a reality, make sure your can pack up and go within 15 minutes. Fire will not wait for you to pack up.

 

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Safety at the Campground

Keep your items safe.

My neighbour Shzz came home to Half Moon Bay on Sunday to find that someone had tried to steal her bikes.  Safety and living on an RV Park is no different from living in a home.  There is always someone ready to want to steal your personal items.

Safety

Bikes

We have been living in our RV for 3 years and in all that time, the only thing that we have had stolen is a knife.  We left the knife outside on a table and it was more fool us.  It was an expensive knife worth around $100.

Shzz decided she would like to write a pice for my blog and give you all some advice on looking after your items.

This piece has been written by Shzz Erkalan

Safety at the Campground

For the most part, campgrounds are safe. You’re more likely to fall and skin a knee or stare down an angry chipmunk than run into trouble of a human kind. It’s not so much that security is an integral part of most campground operations (although fenced-in perimeters, security gates, cameras and 24-hour security are fairly common), but rather RVers aren’t likely to prey on one another – and criminal elements can find better and easier scores elsewhere. Frankly, it’s tough for outsiders to sneak around rows and rows of parked RVs looking for loot. But again, it pays to be careful.

Get in to the habit of locking your rig every time you depart. I know, the place looks so quaint and charming nothing could happen, right? Why take chances – it takes but a matter of seconds to lock up and dissuade the family of kleptomaniacs next door from rummaging through your CD collection. This RV lockdown should include securing exterior storage compartments and windows as well. Close blinds and shades to make “casing the joint” a tougher task. Another perk? Shades keep the sun off the fabrics, which reduces fading. Take cooking items, chairs, and anything you want to be there upon your routine inside the RV or tow vehicle when you’re off at the swimming hole. Set up a neighbor watch by getting to know the people next to you, who are more likely to look after someone they know than complete strangers.

Consider a few devices to protect your vehicle and valuables while you’re away. Although it won’t win you any friends when it goes off accidentally in the night, a vehicle alarm system is a useful defense when you’re away. Motion-detecting lights, also known as “scare lights,” should scatter would-be intruders (not to mention critters). Safes are fairly common options on higher-end RVs, serving as an ideal spot for jewelry and traveler’s checks. If you’re worried about RV theft, invest in a trailer hitch lock or more pricey Lojack-type recovery apparatus. Otherwise, a hungry looking dog might do you just as good. Personally, I like to travel with a Louisville Slugger – just in case.

The choice of the RV park itself is also important. Question management about security. Do they have nightly patrols? Is the park well-lit? How hard is it for non-guests to come and go? Opt for a visible campsite in the heart of the park if safety is utmost on your mind. Travel the grounds in pairs and stay in lighted areas. RV parks in urban settings may be more prone to crime than the Ma and Pa campground tucked away in the boonies. But don’t let that be an excuse for letting your guard down.

Thank you Shzz

 

Safety of your RV 

  1. For safety, lock up your RV always when not at home
  2. Lock any items like bikes with chains
  3. Get yourself a safe in your RV for Personal Items.
  4. Don’t leave anything out that could get taken easily
  5. Attach safety lights – a well-lit area deters unwelcome guests
  6. Close large windows when you go out.
  7. Lock all tools and accessories in under bins for safety.
  8. Keep a whistle handy if someone trys to break in and your home use it to raise an alarm.
  9. Look through windows first before you open your door to let someone in.
  10. Add an alarm to your door so it will make a loud sound should it be open by force.

 

Having a gun in your RV is your choice for safety too, in some states you are allowed a gun.  If a gun is something that you do not want then think about getting a stun gun instead they really do pack a punch and would deter anyone trying to break in.

Check out this torch and stun gun for safety.

 

Think safety and security every time.

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